Cover of: The Hate Crimes Statistics Act | United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee on the Constitution. Read Online
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The Hate Crimes Statistics Act hearing before the Subcommittee on the Constitution of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, second session, on the implementation of the Hate Crimes Statistics Act (Public Law 102-275), August 5, 1992. by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee on the Constitution.

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Published by U.S. G.P.O., For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., Congressional Sales Office in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Hate crimes -- Government policy -- United States.,
  • Minorities -- Crimes against -- Government policy -- United States.,
  • Criminal statistics -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesS. hrg. ;, 102-1131
Classifications
LC ClassificationsKF26 .J8359 1992a
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 139 p. :
Number of Pages139
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1043178M
ISBN 100160415519
LC Control Number93241931
OCLC/WorldCa29233199

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  The Hate Crime Statistics Act, 28 U.S.C. § (HCSA), passed in and modified in by the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, requires the Attorney General to collect data on crimes committed because of the victim's race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or ethnicity. The bill was signed into law by George H. W. Bush, and was the first federal . Of the 8, victims of hate crime, percent were victims of crimes against persons, and percent were victims of crimes against property. The remaining percent were victims of crimes against society. By offense type Crimes against persons (Based on Table 2.) In , 5, victims of hate crimes were victims of crimes against persons. The Hate Crime Statistics Act[i] requires the Attorney General to collect data on crimes committed because of the victim’s race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or ethnicity. In Congress expanded the scope to include crimes based on disability, and in Congress permanently reauthorized the Act.   The number of hate crime incidents reported to the FBI decreased slightly from to , according to the Uniform Crime Reporting Program’s annual Hate Crime Statistics report.

The Hate Crime Statistics Act (28 U.S.C. § ) defines hate crimes as “crimes that manifest evidence of prejudice based on race, gender or gender identity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or ethnicity.” The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) measures crimes perceived by victims to be motivated by an offender’s bias. Hate Crimes. The Federal Bureau of Investigation defines hate crime as "a criminal offense committed against a person, property, or society that is motivated, in whole or in part, by the offender's bias against a race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or ethnicity/national origin.". The Hate Crime Statistics Act, 28 U.S.C. § (HCSA), passed in and modified in by the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, requires the Attorney General to collect data on crimes committed because of the victim's race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or Enacted by: the st United States Congress. "Hate Crime" is the latest book in William Bernhardt's series featuring the likeable Ben Kincaid, a defense attorney with a penchant for taking on hopeless cases. Ben's former legal assistant, Christina McCall, is now his partner/5(29).

The Department of Justice enforces federal hate crimes laws that cover certain crimes committed on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, or disability. The Department of Justice began prosecuting federal hate crimes cases after the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of Shown Here: Passed Senate amended (02/08/) Hate Crime Statistics Act - Directs the Attorney General to: (1) acquire data, for through , about crimes that manifest evidence of prejudice based on race, religion, sexual orientation, or ethnicity, including murder, non-negligent manslaughter, rape, assault, arson, and vandalism; and (2) establish guidelines for the collection of such.   In , the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act amended the Hate Crime Statistics Act to include bias against persons with disabilities. The Church Arson Prevention Act of cemented the Hate Crime Statistics Act by making the collection of hate crime data a permanent part of the UCR program.   According to statistics released by the FBI, hate crimes remain at heightened levels in the United States. Last year, there were 7, hate crime .